Check the Shelf Book Review: Rejection Proof

Rejection Proof: 100 Days of Rejection, or How to Ask Anything of Anyone at Anytime

Rejection Proof by Jia Jiang

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Publisher/Year: Harmony | January 1, 2015

Pages: 240

Series: Stand-Alone

Genre: Non-Fiction Self-Help

Format: Hardback

Source: Own

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I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.  That did not sway my opinion in the least.

Shannan’s Summary

Jiang was finally pushed by his wife to obtain his dream: becoming an entrepreneur.  But at the first sign of rejection, he wanted to quit.  That pushed him to force himself to get over his fear by going on a 100-day quest of failure.  For 100 days he would ask people questions that were sure to get rejected, only that’s not what happened.  Jiang started to examine all the pieces of rejection and how almost anyone can turn rejection into success.was finally pushed by his wife to obtain his dream: becoming an entrepreneur.  But at the first sign of rejection, he wanted to quit.  That pushed him to force himself to get over his fear by going on a 100-day quest of failure.  For 100 days he would ask people questions that were sure to get rejected, only that’s not what happened.  Jiang started to examine all the pieces that goes into an ask and how almost anyone can turn rejection into success.

First Off…

I thought the concept  of looking to be rejected in order to build your tolerance seemed intriguing so I requested the book.

The Story:

I was not expecting to enjoy this the book as much as I did.  I speed through this book quick, especially for it being non-fiction.

The beginning of the book tells Jiang’s story into the 100 days experience.  He had a dream to be an entrepreneur and at the first moment of rejection was ready to give up on his dream.  So he decided to get over this fear by forcing himself to face it.  The first couple times were met with no’s, but what soon started happening was he was getting some yeses.  The book then investigates what causes people to say yes or no.  Then, how to investigate the root of the no to come to either a yes or work together for a collaborative solution.

I really latched onto what Jiang was experiencing because my job gives many opportunities for rejection on many levels.  I’ve usually just given myself the suck-it-up-buttercup speech anticipating the failure and accepting it as part of the job.  But what Jiang made me start thinking about is what if I started using no’s as a conversation starter rather than an ender and really got to the heart of what the person is saying, thinking, or concerned with.  It’s getting past words to the unspoken conversation that makes rejection less likely. 

The Writing

Jiang has a great style that strings you along.  He brilliantly takes you from story, to research, to reflection, to life application without causing awkward breaks or removing the reader from the experience of reading.  This is a great book to read if you’re thinking of writing a memoir/life help book.  Or if you’re looking at turning your blog into a book.

In the End

This is a great book for anyone that struggles with rejection to read, which I think is everyone.  I’ll be rereading and underlining this one.

10 Second Summary:

  1. Great stories:  The stories of rejection were interesting and humorous and sometimes bazaar.  
  2. A new way to look at rejection: Rejection doesn’t have to kill a conversation, but it can start one you were planning on.  
  3. Good example of Turing a blog into a book: If you’re considering turning your blog into a book, this is a great example

Check the Shelf Review

Hardback level.  I’ll be encouraging a lot of people I work with to read this book.

 

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